MAR511 - Marine auxiliary equipment

Course Code:

MAR511

Course Title:

Marine auxiliary equipment

Level:

Postgraduate career-based course

Credits:

6 ECTS

Department:

Maritime Studies/Mechanical Engineering

Pre-requisites:

BSc or BEng Mechanical Engineering (or equivalent)

Introduction and Rationale:

Modern merchant vessels are complex engineering structures dependent for their operation on a wide variety of mechanical, electrical and electronic systems. Good knowledge and in depth understanding of these systems therefore constitutes a major part of the marine engineering curriculum. Most of these systems are common to many types of vessels although the degree of importance and engineering complexity might vary from case to case and is subject to engineering development and progress.

 Aim:

The aim of the course is to provide the fundamental engineering knowledge of common traditional marine engineering systems while introducing technology evolution as appropriate for each case, to meet the requirements of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) Standards of Training and Certification of Watchkeepers (STCW) for Engineering Officer of the Watch (EOOW) at operational level.

 Learning Outcomes:

On completion of this course the student will know:

  • Explain the purpose and use of legislation and legislative organisations; Administrations, Classification Societies, MARPOL, M-Notice types, H&S at work, IMO, SOLAS, ISM, STCW, COSWP
  • Watchkeeping requirements for safe and efficient operation of engine room and auxiliary equipment spaces. Describe watchkeeping activities required for the safe and efficient operation of the vessel. State the procedures for accepting and handing over a watch and requirements for UMS operations. State the documents used explaining their use and importance.
  • Define an enclosed space, stating the enclosed space entry procedure, explaining the dangers that may be encountered.
  • Understands the importance of the Permit to Work system.
  • Knows how to access Material Data Safety Sheets (MSDS) and interpret their contents.
  • Has a knowledge of the type approval procedures.
  • Operation and procedures for ballast, bilge and oil transfer systems.
  • Sketch and describe bilge, bilge injection, ballast systems. Identify problems that may occur and state their causes.
  • Describe fuel transfer procedures with reference to stability considerations.
  • Describe the operation of a basic refrigeration system, referring to the condition of the refrigerant at cardinal points. Diagnose faults from given symptoms, describe the charging and recovery of refrigerant.
  • Sketch and describe the operation of sewage systems, fresh water generators including potable water treatment.
  • Describe the operation of control and start air compressors, stating the starting and stopping sequence and the purpose of the safety devices fitted.
  • Describe the procedure for starting and stopping auxiliary engines including first start arrangement.
  • Explain the principle of operation of centrifugal separators, including the importance of the correct gravity disc, speed, flow rate, temperature. Differentiate between purifier and clarifier. Explain the consequences of water contamination of fuel and lubricating oil.
  • Sketch and describe a centrifugal pump, explaining its operating principle, stating possible faults and their causes. Describe priming methods. Sketch and describe positive displacement pumps, explaining why they need relief valves.
  • Operation and construction of heat exchangers, stating their advantages/disadvantages.
  • State the checks to be made on the steering gear prior to leaving port.
  • Describe the pollution prevention procedures and equipment, spillage procedures, bunkering procedure.
  • Fire detection and fire fighting equipment and procedures. Describe the construction and operation of portable fire extinguishers. State their identification and placement. State the classes of Fire and the actions to be taken on discovering a fire. Describe the organisation of fire parties and emergency parties. Describe the testing of CABA. State the preparations required before operating fixed fire fighting installations. Describe the construction, operation and testing of fire detector heads.
  • Sketch and describe the operation of oil water separators, explaining their operating principles. State the MARPOL requirements, describe the associated documentation required.
  • State the importance of the main propulsion thrust bearing, describing its operation and the importance of the oil temperature.
  • Describe the starting and maintenance of lifeboat engines. Explain how the fall of a lifeboat is controlled.

Main Learning and Teaching Activities:

Lectures will provide a conceptual framework of all key areas. Students will work individually and/or in groups for their assignments. Computer based learning packages, simulation, Universities resources and industrial visits will support familiarisation with the various types of marine equipment where applicable. Guest lecturers from industry will supplement practical input and experience whenever possible.

Assessment Details:

Method of assessment

Weighting %

Outline detail

Coursework

40%

1 individual assignment:
1 assignment on Auxiliary Marine Equipment

Examination

60%

Closed book 3 hour combined written exam:
Part A 1.5 hours – Auxiliary Marine Equipment
(Part B 1.5 hours – Ship Construction)

MAR512 - Marine electrical systems and control engineering

Course Code:

MAR512

Course Title:

Marine electrical systems and control engineering

Level:

Postgraduate career-based course

Credits:

12 ECTS

Department:

Maritime Studies/Mechanical Engineering

Pre-requisites:

BSc or BEng Mechanical Engineering (or equivalent)

Introduction and Rationale:

Modern merchant vessels are complex engineering structures dependent for their operation on a wide variety of mechanical, electrical and electronic systems. Good knowledge and in depth understanding of these systems therefore constitutes a major part of the marine engineering curriculum. Most of these systems are common to many types of vessels although the degree of importance and engineering complexity might vary from case to case and is subject to engineering development and progress.

Aim:

The aim of the course is to provide the fundamental engineering knowledge of common traditional marine engineering systems while introducing technology evolution as appropriate for each case, to meet the requirements of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) Standards of Training and Certification of Watchkeepers (STCW) for Engineering Officer of the Watch (EOOW) at operational level. 

Electricity section

Learning Outcomes:

On completion of this course the student will know:

  • DC circuits with resistances in parallel and series.
  • Power and energy in DC circuits.
  • AC circuits comprising resistance capacitance and inductance, voltage and current magnification factor.
  • True power, apparent power and power factor.
  • Solve problems involving DC circuits with resistances in parallel and series.
  • Solve problems involving power and energy in DC circuits.
  • Solve problems involving AC circuit comprising resistance capacitance and inductance, voltage and current magnification factor.
  • Solve problems involving true power, apparent power and power factor.
  • Maintenance of and safety requirements for working on electrical equipment. Protection of generators and distribution systems.
  • State the requirements for safe working on electrical equipment, stating the procedure for treatment of electric shock. State the procedure for working near live equipment.
  • Describe the maintenance required for electrical motors and electrical systems. Explain the cause, detection and prevention of earth faults. Differentiate between earthed and insulated neutral systems.
  • State the requirements and procedure for paralleling of generators. Explain the consequences of incorrect paralleling and the protection devices fitted.
  • Describe the switchboard protection devices for protection of generators and distribution system, explaining the need for discrimination.
  • Describe the operation, testing and maintenance of the emergency alternator, together with the emergency battery supply.
  • Operation and maintenance of storage batteries. Differentiate between different types of storage batteries, stating their uses. Describe the maintenance required and the precautions to be taken.
  • Conventions and interpretation of electrical circuit diagrams. Identify items within a circuit diagram and explain possible effects of faults.

Control section

Learning Outcomes:

On completion of this course the student will know:

  • Instruments.
  • Operation and application of a range of transducers suitable for measuring the following variables: temperature, flow, displacement, viscosity, pressure, strain, position and level.
  • Explain the following properties of a transducer: range, accuracy, repeatability, sensitivity, resolution, linearity and hysteresis.
  • Identification of suitable transducers for various control systems.
  • Regulators
  • Control of level, temperature, pressure. Describe the control of systems using two step control, proportional control describing the operation of the transducer.
  • Describe the operation of pneumatic and electrical actuators. Explain the use and operation of positioners.
  • Fail safe and fail set. Explain failure modes, giving examples for different systems.
  • Identification of suitable actuators for given control systems.
  • Control Systems
  • Describe the behaviour of an on-off type of control system and give an example of an application.
  • Draw a block diagram of a specified closed loop control system consisting of a controller, external input (set point), error detector, error signal, actuator, regulator, manipulated variable, process, controlled variable, feedback loop, transducer and any appropriate signal conditioning devices.
  • Continuous control systems.
  • Draw an output/time graph showing the transient and steady state response of a closed loop system in response to a unit step input. The graph should be labelled with steady state error, time to peak, time to settle, overshoot and final value.
  • Draw labelled graphs showing over damped, under damped, and critically damped behaviour in a closed loop system.
  • Explain Gain/Proportional band, integral action time, and derivative action time. Choose the appropriate action and/or actions for given systems.
  • Draw graphs to show the effects of change of P, I and D variables on system response referencing; set point/load changes, offset/steady state errors, overshoot, initial rate of change and settling time.
  • System Diagrams
  • Conventions and interpretation of systems drawn to BS1553 and BS1646. Identify and explain the purpose of symbols highlighted on a typical Pipe and Instrument Diagram.

Main Learning and Teaching Activities:

Lectures will provide a conceptual framework of all key areas. Students will work individually and/or in groups for their assignments. Computer based learning packages, simulation, Universities resources and industrial visits will support familiarisation with the various types of marine equipment where applicable. Guest lecturers from industry will supplement practical input and experience whenever possible.

Assessment Details:

Method of assessment

Weighting %

Outline detail

Coursework

40%

2 individual assignments:

1 assignment on Electricity

1 assignment on Control Engineering

Examination

60%

Closed book 3 hour combined written exam:

Part A 1.5 hours – Electricity

Part B 1.5 hours – Control Engineering

MAR514 - Marine power (Motor, steam)

Course Code:

MAR514

Course Title:

Marine power (Motor, steam)

Level:

Postgraduate career-based course

Credits:

6 ECTS

Department:

Maritime Studies/Mechanical Engineering

Pre-requisites:

BSc or BEng Mechanical Engineering (or equivalent)

Introduction and Rationale:

Modern merchant vessels are complex engineering structures dependent for their operation on a wide variety of mechanical, electrical and electronic systems. Good knowledge and in depth understanding of these systems therefore constitutes a major part of the marine engineering curriculum. Most of these systems are common to many types of vessels although the degree of importance and engineering complexity might vary from case to case and is subject to engineering development and progress.

Aim:

The aim of the course is to provide the fundamental engineering knowledge of common traditional marine engineering systems while introducing technology evolution as appropriate for each case, to meet the requirements of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) Standards of Training and Certification of Watchkeepers (STCW) for Engineering Officer of the Watch (EOOW) at operational level.

Motor section

Note: this section is only for candidates taking the EOOW (motor) Licence

Learning Outcomes:

On completion of this course the student will know:

  • Watchkeeping requirements on main propulsion and auxiliary engines. Safe preparation and shutdown of main propulsion and auxiliary engines. Starting, stopping and control of main propulsion and auxiliary engines. Procedures for emergency situations.
  • Describe watchkeeping activities required to maintain operation of main propulsion and auxiliary machinery and associated systems (fuel, lubrication, cooling, air, starting). State the procedures for accepting and handing over a watch and requirements for UMS operations.
  • Describe the basic refinery processes used in the production of marine fuel and lubricating oils
  • Know the contents of ISO8217, Marine fuels. Describe the physical properties and contaminations and how they may affect the running of main and auxiliary engines.
  • Identify and explain the function of the constructional components and running gear of diesel engines and turbochargers, describing the routine maintenance required.
  • Describe the operating principles of two and four stroke diesel engines including timing diagrams and indicator cards.
  • Describe the operating principles and explain the purpose of turbochargers.
  • Describe the operating principles and maintenance of main reduction gearboxes.
  • Describe the operating principles and maintenance of transmission system clutches.
  • Describe the preparation of propulsion and auxiliary machinery from cold to ready for manoeuvring and shutdown to normal port conditions, explain the reasons for correct warming and cooling down.
  • Explain starting and reversing of diesel engines and describe the requirements to operate from local, engine side control.
  • Identify faults and explain the remedial actions required when given observations and symptoms of main propulsion plant, auxiliary machinery and associated systems. (Fuel, lubrication, cooling, air, starting)
  • Explain the importance of maintaining correct parameters, levels, clearances, lubricating oil condition. Describe the control of temperatures, pressures, viscosity associated with main propulsion and auxiliary machinery
  • Explain the causes and dangers arising from scavenge fires, crankcase oil mist, economiser fires, describing their prevention. State how they are detected and the procedure to be taken should they occur.
  • Sketch ancillary systems required for operation of main propulsion and auxiliary machinery; cooling water, lubricating oil, high pressure fuel, starting air, fuel oil storage and preparation, identifying the major components and describing the maintenance required.
  • Operation, control, protection and maintenance of starting air compressors and storage. Describe the manual and automatic operation of starting air compressors. State, and explain the need for, the protection devices fitted.
  • Explain the difference between main and auxiliary boilers.
  • Explain the difference between fire tube and water tube boilers.
  • Describe where steam may be used on-board a vessel
  • Operation, control, protection and maintenance of an auxiliary boiler and feed system.
  • Identify the fittings of auxiliary boilers and explain their purpose. Describe the testing of level gauges, alarms and safety valves.
  • Describe and explain the warming procedure for an auxiliary boiler.
  • State the operating sequence of an automatic burner unit of an auxiliary boiler, explain the need for purging and state the checks and precautions required.
  • Describe the feed system for an auxiliary boiler; explain the need for, and describe, boiler water tests. Explain the consequences of boiler water contamination.

Steam section

Note: this section is only for candidates taking the EOOW (steam) Licence

Learning Outcomes:

On completion of this course the student will know:

  • Watchkeeping requirements on boilers, turbines, condensate systems and auxiliary engines. Safe preparation and shutdown of boilers and turbines and condensate system.
  • Starting, stopping and control of main propulsion and auxiliary turbines. Procedures for emergency situations.
  • Describe watchkeeping activities required to maintain operation of main propulsion and boilers, auxiliary machinery and associated systems (fuel, lubrication, condensate, cooling, heating). State the procedures for accepting and handing over a watch and requirements for UMS operations.
  • Describe the basic refinery processes used in the production of marine fuel and lubricating oils
  • Know the contents of ISO8217, Marine fuels. Describe the physical properties and contaminations and how they may affect the running of main and auxiliary engines.
  • Operation and construction of boilers, turbines and gearing.
  • Identification of faults and understand the remedial action required on boilers, turbines and condensate systems.
  • Operation of ancillary systems for boilers, main propulsion and auxiliary machinery. Operation, control, protection and maintenance of auxiliary engines.
  • Explain the importance of maintaining correct parameters, levels, clearances, lubricating oil condition.
  • Describe the preparation of propulsion and auxiliary machinery from cold to ready for manoeuvring and shutdown to normal port conditions, explain the reasons for correct warming and cooling down.
  • Explain starting and reversing of turbines and describe the requirements to operate from local control including testing and operation of emergency trips.
  • Describe the control of temperatures, pressures, levels associated with main propulsion, boilers and auxiliary machinery.
  • Identify faults and explain the actions required when given observations and symptoms of main propulsion plant, auxiliary machinery and associated systems. (Fuel, lubrication, cooling, condensate, heating)
  • Sketch ancillary systems required for operation of main propulsion and auxiliary machinery; cooling water, lubricating oil, condensate, fuel oil storage and preparation, heating, identifying the major components and describing the maintenance required.
  • Describe the construction of boilers, main turbines and condensers.
  • Describe transmission gearing arrangements, explaining their purpose and faults that may occur.
  • Describe the operation and maintenance of auxiliary engines, identify faults and explain the need for safety devices.
  • Describe and explain the warming procedure for a main boiler, stating the requirements for coupling boilers.
  • Describe the maintenance of main boilers, testing of alarms and safety devices.
  • Explain the need for, and describe, boiler water tests. Explain the consequences of boiler water contamination.
  • State the operating sequence of an automatic burner unit of a main boiler, explain the need for purging and state the checks and precautions required.
  • Operation and maintenance of the condensate and feed system. Describe the component parts of a condensate and feed system for a main boiler and turbine plant.

Main Learning and Teaching Activities:

Lectures will provide a conceptual framework of all key areas. Students will work individually and/or in groups for their assignments. Computer based learning packages, simulation, Universities resources and industrial visits will support familiarisation with the various types of marine equipment where applicable. Guest lecturers from industry will supplement practical input and experience whenever possible.

Assessment Details:

Method of assessment

Weighting %

Outline detail

Coursework

40%

2 individual assignments

Examination

60%

Closed book 2 hour written exam

MAR513 - Marine ship construction

Course Code:

MAR512

Course Title:

Marine ship construction

Level:

Postgraduate career-based course

Credits:

6 ECTS

Department:

Maritime Studies/Mechanical Engineering

Pre-requisites:

BSc or BEng Mechanical Engineering (or equivalent)

Introduction and Rationale:

Modern merchant vessels are complex engineering structures dependent for their operation on a wide variety of mechanical, electrical and electronic systems. Good knowledge and in depth understanding of these systems therefore constitutes a major part of the marine engineering curriculum. Most of these systems are common to many types of vessels although the degree of importance and engineering complexity might vary from case to case and is subject to engineering development and progress.

Aim:

The aim of the course is to provide the fundamental engineering knowledge of common traditional marine engineering systems while introducing technology evolution as appropriate for each case, to meet the requirements of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) Standards of Training and Certification of Watchkeepers (STCW) for Engineering Officer of the Watch (EOOW) at operational level.

Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this course the student will know:

  • Solve problems to determine thrust on horizontal and vertical immersed surfaces.
  • Solve problems involving the use of formula ρgh to establish pressure at a specified depth.
  • Describe centre of pressure and the centroid of an immersed surface, explaining how they differ. Solve problems involving the use of centre of pressure and centroid of immersed and partially immersed surfaces and the reaction at flat surface supports.
  • The reaction at surface supports of immersed and partially immersed surfaces.
  • The principles of Archimedes. Solve problems applying the Principles of Archimedes to floating rectangular shaped vessels.
  • The relationship between centre of gravity and centre of buoyancy and the significance of the relative position of these points.
  • The changes to the vessel’s condition when weights are added, removed and moved.
  • Explain the relationship between centre of gravity and centre of buoyancy and the significance of the relative position of these points.
  • Solve problems involving simple ship shapes to establish changes relating to the changes in vessel condition when weights are added, removed or moved within the ship.
  • Apply the formula GM= md / D tan a
  • Identify and describe the difference and functions between different standard types of ship; general cargo; heavy lift; container; ferry; ro-ro; oil, chemical and gas tankers; passenger vessels, cruise ships etc
  • The six degrees of freedom of movement of a vessel.
  • Static and dynamic ship stresses.
  • Understands the importance of vessel stability.
  • Knows how to carry out an inclining experiment to determine the basic stability parameters.
  • Describe the difference between heel and list. Describe trim.
  • Describe the effect of moving weights on-board a vessel.
  • Describe the importance of buoyancy.
  • The structural components of a vessel and the open deck drainage arrangements.
  • Watertight division.
  • Effects on stability of transferring fluids within the vessel.
  • Describe, with sketches, major structural parts of a ship explaining their purpose. Sketch mid-ship cross sections of standard vessels.
  • Know how to access the Classification Society Rules and Regulations. To be able to name the major Class Societies
  • Describe freeing ports and scuppers, explaining their purpose.
  • Describe the testing for water tightness of doors, hatches and bulkheads.
  • Explain load lines, draft marks, the load line survey, identifying items included in the survey.
  • Measurement of tonnage and displacement.
  • Describes the different types of drydocking, and procedures to enter and leave a drydock.
  • Knows the procedures and safety aspects of carrying out a drydock survey.
  • Understands aspects and requirements of an in-water-survey (IWS)
  • Describes types, manufacture and materials with respect to propellers.
  • Describes types, manufacture and materials with respect to stern tubes.
  • Describes types, manufacture and materials with respect to propeller shafts.
  • Describes types and construction of rudders.

Assessment Details:

Method of assessment

Weighting %

Outline detail

Coursework

40%

1 individual assignment:

1 assignment on Ship Construction

This assignment will be carrying out an inclining experiment using the ship model

Examination

60%

Closed book 3 hour combined written exam:

(Part A 1.5 hours – Auxiliary Marine Equipment)

Part B 1.5 hours – Ship Construction

MAR521 - Workshop Training for marine engineering

Course Code:

MAR521

Course Title:

Workshop Training for marine engineering

Level:

Postgraduate career-based course

Credits:

30 ECTS

Department:

Maritime Studies/Mechanical Engineering

Pre-requisites:

BSc or BEng Mechanical Engineering (or equivalent)

Introduction and Rationale:
Modern merchant vessels are complex engineering structures dependent for their operation on a wide variety of mechanical, electrical and electronic systems. Good knowledge and in depth understanding of these systems therefore constitutes a major part of the marine engineering curriculum. Most of these systems are common to many types of vessels although the degree of importance and engineering complexity might vary from case to case and is subject to engineering development and progress.

Aim:
The aim of the course is to provide the fundamental engineering knowledge and practical skills to operate and maintain marine engineering systems on-board a vessel, to meet the requirements of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) Standards of Training and Certification of Watchkeepers (STCW) for Engineering Officer of the Watch (EOOW) at operational level.

Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this course the student will know:

  • Contents of the Code of Safe Working Practices (COSWP)
  • Suitable personal protective clothing and equipment (PPE)
  • Workshop safety when using hand tools, machine tools and measuring instruments
  • Identification and use of hand tools, machine tools and measuring instruments
  • Measuring instruments
  • The use of appropriate specialized tools and measuring instruments
  • Powered hand tools
  • Machine tools, centre lathes, milling machine, grinding machines (static and portable)
  • Safety and health when welding
  • Welding, brazing and soldering
  • Principles of different welding methods, electric, gas etc
  • Welded joints in low-carbon steel
  • Weld inspection, weld testing, common faults in welded joints
  • Thermal cutting
  • Use of various types of sealants and packings
  • Safety measures to be taken for repair and maintenance with both mechanical and electrical equipment
  • Maintenance and repair such as dismantling, adjustment and reassembling of machinery and equipment including:
    • Fastenings, nuts, bolts, studs etc
    • Hydraulic jacks and nuts
    • Correct use of torque spanners
    • Diesel engine
    • Turbocharger
    • Boiler
    • Boiler water testing
    • Liner calibration
    • Crankshaft deflections
    • Centrifugal pumps
    • Reciprocating pumps
    • Screw and gear pumps
    • Centrifugal separator
    • Test procedures for fuels and LO
    • Fuel and LO filters
    • Valves
    • Making a pipeline joint
    • High risk pipe and valve connections
    • Air compressors
    • Heat exchangers (plate and tube types)
    • Shafting system
    • Refrigerator system
    • Electric motors
    • Correct electrical wiring connections
    • Balancing and fitting bearings
    • Electrical and electronic equipment
    • Deck Machinery

Main Learning and Teaching Activities:
Lectures and supervised practical student activities will provide a framework of all key areas. Students will work individually and/or in groups for their assignments. Computer based learning packages, simulation, Universities resources and industrial visits will support familiarisation with the various types of marine equipment where applicable. Guest lecturers from industry will supplement practical input and experience whenever possible.

Assessment Details:

Method of assessment

Weighting %

Outline detail

Practical supervised student activities in the workshop

100%

Each task completed must be signed off in the Student Workshop Training Record Book